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The Hidden Wonders Of Wales

The Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of Wales
The Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of Wales

The Hidden Wonders Of Wales

Wales or Cymru as it is known in Welsh is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It is bordered by England to the East and the Atlantic Ocean and the Irish Sea to the West. It covers a total area of 20,779 km (8,022 Square Miles) or roughly the same size as Israel, Slovenia or El Salvador. Wales also boasts a strong national identity and is famous for its mountains, its castles, its dragons, its mines, its choirs and its rugby players.

The Welsh national identity emerged following the Romans withdrawal from Britain during the 5th Century. With Wales remaining independent until the 13th century and Llewlyn's defeat by Edward I of England, at which point Wales became part of the United Kingdom. Many years later however, the late 19th century saw a resurgence of Welsh politics despite the country being under British domination since the Medieval Times. The first "Welsh law" to be voted in by the British Parliament was the Welsh Sunday Closing Act of 1881. However, it is not until 1955 that Cardiff was proclaimed the country's capital city, and the Welsh had to wait until 1999 to see the creation of the National Assembly of Wales.

Wales is also the scene to spectacular landscapes that vary from mountains in the North and the Centre to the sandy beaches and torn coastline of the Pembrokshire Coast. What's more, these spectacular landscapes are protected within three national parks (Snowdonia, Brecon Beacons, and the Pembrokshire Coast) and four areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty (Anglesey, Clwydian Range, Gower Peninsula and Llyn Peninsula).

The Snowdonia area was granted National Park status in 1951. It is the largest of the three Welsh national parks as it covers an overall area of 2,170 km (519 Square Miles).The area is named after the highest mountain in Wales, Mount Snowdon (1,085m). The Snowdonia national park is not only a mountainous area, it also pleases the eye with a spectacular coastline that runs from the Llyn Peninsula down to the Mid-Wales Coast.

The Brecon Beacons National Park was established in 1957 and covers an overall area of 1,344 km (519 Square Miles), stretching from Llandeilo in the West to Hay-on-Wye to the East. The park's main feature is the Brecon Beans mountain range that attracts many cyclists, walkers and horse-riders. However, due to the remoteness of certain areas and the hostile weather conditions, the park also plays host to army training camps.

The Pembrokeshire Coast obtained national park status in 1952. It is the smallest national park in Wales as it covers a total area of only 629km (243 Square Miles). However, it is the first area in the United Kingdom to be made a national park because of its spectacular coastline. The park is famous for the coastal walks along its spectacular coastline and the fishing spot of Saint Bride's Bay that dominates the park.

Anglesey is the most famous of the four Areas of Outstanding beauty that are dotted along the Welsh Coast. The island of Anglesey covers an overall area of 714km (276 Square Miles) which makes the fifth largest island surrounding the United Kingdom. The island is linked to mainland Wales by two suspension bridges, the Menai Suspension bridge that was designed by Thomas Telford in 1826 and more recently the Britannia Bridge, which serves as both a road and rail link with mainland UK.

This article was provided by Pontin's Holiday Parks in Prestatyn.

 

Article Courtesy Of Goarticles.com

The Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of WalesThe Hidden Wonders Of Wales